• Users Online: 218
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
  Table of Contents  
CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 201-202  

Drawstring lichen planus: A unique case of Koebnerization


Department of Dermatology and STD, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Madagadipet, Pondicherry, India

Date of Web Publication13-May-2016

Correspondence Address:
Lakshmanan Kumara
Department of Dermatology and STD, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Madagadipet, Pondicherry - - 605 107
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-5178.182368

Rights and Permissions
   Abstract 

Drawstring dermatitis is a type of frictional dermatitis that can result from a traditional tightly worn garments such as sari or salwaar-kameez. We report a 54-year-old female patient presented with lichen planus of the drawstring site that was confirmed histopathologically. This case is rare and demonstrates how sociocultural practices can influence the presentation of common dermatoses such as LP.

Keywords: Drawstring, lichen planus, Koebnerization, Koebner phenomenon


How to cite this article:
Kumara L, Rangaraj M, Karthikeyan K. Drawstring lichen planus: A unique case of Koebnerization. Indian Dermatol Online J 2016;7:201-2

How to cite this URL:
Kumara L, Rangaraj M, Karthikeyan K. Drawstring lichen planus: A unique case of Koebnerization. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Oct 23];7:201-2. Available from: http://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2016/7/3/201/182368


   Introduction Top


Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory and immune-mediated disease that affects the skin, nails, hair, and mucous membranes.[1] The development of a true Koebner phenomenon or the isomorphic response in LP is a well-established fact.[2] Rarely, linear papules may be the initial presentation of the disease, presumably reflecting Koebnerization into the sites of previous trauma or scratching.[3]

This report aims to demonstrate an uncommon clinical presentation of LP, with Koebner phenomenon, involving a rare site.


   Case Report Top


A 54-year-old female patient presented with the chief complaints of itchy raised lesions on the hip (at the site of friction by clothing, inner waist coat) for a period of two months. She did not have similar lesions elsewhere in the body, including the oral cavity. She did not take any drugs prior to the onset of these lesions. Her past history was insignificant.

On examination, well-defined violaceous polygonal flat-topped papules and plaques coalescing with one another were noted, arranged circumferentially from the hip to the lower back on both sides in an interrupted pattern [Figure 1]. Rest of the skin, mucosa, hair, and nails were normal.
Figure 1: Violaceous coalescing papules along the waist line.

Click here to view


Routine blood investigations were within normal limits. HIV, hepatitis B and C serology were negative. Skin biopsy of a well-defined papule [Figure 2] (H and E section) showed compact orthokeratosis, focal parakeratosis, wedge-shaped hypergranulosis, irregular acanthosis, vacuolar alteration of the basal layer in the epidermis, and a band-like lymphocytic infiltrate in the papillary dermis, suggestive of lichen planus. The patient was prescribed topical betamethasone diproprionate ointment and advised to wear the drawstring loosely.
Figure 2: Low-power view showing lichenoid band of infiltrate with focal areas of basal cell vacuolation (H and E, ×10)

Click here to view



   Discussion Top


Drawstring dermatitis is a type of frictional dermatitis that can result from a traditional tightly worn garments such as the sari orthe salwaar-kameez.[4] The resulting chronic friction may result in dermatoses such as lichenified grooves, postinflammatory depigmentation, or leukoderma. It may also result in Koebnerizaton of preexisting dermatoses such as vitiligo and LP.[5]

In our patient, the initial presentation of LP was at the site of friction due to drawstring. This Koebnerization due to drawstring is rare and only one case had been previously reported.[5]

The other interesting feature is that it was the initial presentation of LP in our patient. This case is unique and demonstrates how sociocultural practices can influence the presentation of common dermatoses such as LP.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Gorouhi F, Davari P, Fazel N. Cutaneous and mucosal lichen planus: A comprehensive review of clinical subtypes, risk factors, diagnosis, and prognosis. ScientificWorldJournal 2014;2014:742826.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Thappa DM. The isomorphic phenomenon of Koebner. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2004;70:187-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.
Shiohara T, Kano Y. Lichen planus and lichenoid dermatoses. In: Bolognia J, Jorizzo J, Schaffer J, editors. Dermatology. 3rd ed. New York: Mosby; 2012. p. 183-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Gupta D, Thappa DM. Dermatoses due to Indian cultural practices. Indian J Dermatol 2015;60:3-12.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
5.
Verma SB. Dermatological signs in South Asian women induced by sari and petticoat drawstrings. Clin Exp Dermatol 2010;35:459-61.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]


This article has been cited by
1 Dermatoses caused by cultural practices
Neelam A. Vashi,Nicole Patzelt,Stephen Wirya,Mayra B.C. Maymone,Roopal V. Kundu
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2018; 79(1): 19
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    Abstract
   Introduction
   Case Report
   Discussion
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1069    
    Printed5    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded134    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal