Indian Dermatology Online Journal

THROUGH THE LENS
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 755--756

Molluscum contagiosum in interdigital area of foot in a pregnant patient


Murat Ozturk1, Rojda Aktar2, Remzi Erten3,  
1 Department of Dermatology, Health Sciences University, Van Training and Research Hospital, Van, Turkey
2 Department of Dermatology, Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Van, Turkey
3 Department of Pathology, Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Van, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Murat Ozturk
Department of Dermatology, Health Sciences University, Van Training and Research Hospital, Van
Turkey




How to cite this article:
Ozturk M, Aktar R, Erten R. Molluscum contagiosum in interdigital area of foot in a pregnant patient.Indian Dermatol Online J 2019;10:755-756


How to cite this URL:
Ozturk M, Aktar R, Erten R. Molluscum contagiosum in interdigital area of foot in a pregnant patient. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 May 26 ];10:755-756
Available from: http://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2019/10/6/755/270213


Full Text



A 20-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with a complaint of swelling on her toe for 5 months. She had a 7-month history of pregnancy and it was learned that the lesion had grown during pregnancy. No similar lesions were observed in another part of the body. Her medical history and family history were normal. ELISA for HIV was negative. Dermatological examination revealed a pale erythematous papule on the third interdigital region that had a sulcus on it [Figure 1]. Pyogenic granuloma and molluscum contagiosum (MC) were considered and the lesion was totally excised. Histopathological examination revealed intracytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies in keratinocytes [Figure 2].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

MC is a common infection caused by an MC virus.[1] It mainly affects young children, sexually active adults and immunocompromised patients.[2] Umbilicated pearly papules are usually sufficient for diagnosis. MC may spread by autoinoculation, direct contact, towel, or swimming.[1],[3] The most affected sites are the genital region, the axillary and the popliteal fossa. Oral mucosa, conjunctiva, and plantar involvement are rare. The clinical diagnosis of MC infections in atypical localization may be difficult and may be related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.[4] Lesions at the base of the foot can be mixed with epidermal cyst, eccrine poroma, verruca, and pyogenic granuloma.[4],[5]

In conclusion, we think that pregnancy, which is an immunosuppressive condition, causes the development and growth of MC in interdigital area which is an atypical localization for MC infection.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

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4Aydoǧan I, Küçükçakır O, Kavak A, Yıldırım U. Interdigital molluscum contagiosum on the foot. Int J Dermatol 2014;53:e396-7.
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