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Year : 2014  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 360  

Scanty, short scalp hair along with keratotic papular lesions on the scalp of a 7-year-old boy


Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India

Date of Web Publication31-Jul-2014

Correspondence Address:
Tulika Rai
C-24, Swastik Towers, Lanka, Varanasi - 221 005
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-5178.137812

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How to cite this article:
Rai T, Singh SK. Scanty, short scalp hair along with keratotic papular lesions on the scalp of a 7-year-old boy. Indian Dermatol Online J 2014;5:360

How to cite this URL:
Rai T, Singh SK. Scanty, short scalp hair along with keratotic papular lesions on the scalp of a 7-year-old boy. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Jun 22];5:360. Available from: https://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2014/5/3/360/137812

A 7-year-old boy presented in our skin OPD with scanty, brittle, and short scalp hair since birth. There was no history of consanguinity in his parents and no family member had similar disease. On light microscopic examination, there was characteristic beading and internodal thinning of hair shaft. There were multiple, keratotic papules on the entire scalp which was extending to the forehead and neck [Figure 1]. Detailed physical examination was done and no dental defects or mental retardation was found.
Figure 1: Keratotic papular lesions with scanty, short, brittle hair on the scalp

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Monilethrix is a rare condition, characterized by the presence of beaded shaft of the scalp hair. Hair shaft shows a beaded appearance due to alternate zones of spindle-like thickening and thinning placed about 0.7 to 1 mm apart. Swelling represents normal part of the hair, whereas narrowing part is abnormal. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and rarely can be autosomal recessive. [1] These changes are usually associated with a follicular hyperkeratosis or keratosis pilaris. [2] Its pedigree presentation is suggestive of hereditary transmission. One case of monilethrix with pedigree was reported by Solomon and Green. [3] Many therapies like oral steroids, retinoids, and immunosuppressive drugs are suggested. [3] In our case, there was no similar illness in family members. It was a sporadic case. We have given low dose isotretinoin to the patient (0.5 mg/kg body weight) and the patient is on follow-up.



 
   References Top

1.Dawber RP, Ebling FJ, Wojnarowska FT. Disorders of Hair. In: Champion RH, Burton JL, Ebling FJ, editors. Textbook of Dermatology. 5 th ed, Vol. 4. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publication; 1992. p. 2607.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Raval RC, Bilimoria FE. Monilethrix in pedigree. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1996;62:388-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.Solomon IL, Greem OC. Monilethrix. N Engl J Med 1963;269:1279-85.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


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