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THROUGH THE DERMOSCOPE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 362-363  

“Hair building” fibers through the dermoscope


Department of Dermatology, King Faisal University, Al Hasa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Date of Web Publication4-Sep-2018

Correspondence Address:
Feroze Kaliyadan
Department of Dermatology, King Faisal University, Al Hasa
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_325_17

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How to cite this article:
Kaliyadan F, Feroze K. “Hair building” fibers through the dermoscope. Indian Dermatol Online J 2018;9:362-3

How to cite this URL:
Kaliyadan F, Feroze K. “Hair building” fibers through the dermoscope. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Apr 19];9:362-3. Available from: https://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2018/9/5/362/240527



A 40-year-old female patient presented to us with complaints of hair loss and thinning of hair mainly over the central parting [Figure 1]. The patient had applied a commercially available “hair-building” fiber for increasing apparent density of the hair. On trichoscopy (polarized light 10×, Dermlite Foto ii Pro), some findings suggestive of female pattern hair loss were seen (including increased hair diameter diversity and patchy honeycomb pigmentation); however, the findings were not significant enough to conclusively diagnose female pattern hair loss based on dermoscopy alone.
Figure 1: Thinning of hair over central parting

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Also seen were multiple, short, black, hair-like fibers scattered over the scalp in a bizarre pattern [Figure 2]. Trichoscopy was repeated after cleaning a focal area of the scalp with alcohol gel. Despite cleaning, a few isolated hair fibers were seen which appeared like hair fragments, with some showing a bent appearance, akin to the bending, which is sometimes seen secondary to coudability in alopecia areata.[1] The sharp bends also gave some of them an appearance simulating zigzag hairs[2] [Figure 3].
Figure 2: Dermoscopy ×10, Foto ii Pro, polarized light – showing multiple, short, black, hair-like fibers scattered over the scalp in a bizarre pattern

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Figure 3: Dermoscopy ×10, Foto ii Pro, polarized light – showing isolated artificial fibers some showing a bent appearance (black arrow)

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Common artefacts seen on the hair during trichoscopy include dirty dots, textile/hat fibers, leftover hair dye, make-up foundation, hair shaft fragments, and hair building fibers.[3]

Dirty dots are irregularly-shaped and distributed brownish, environmental particles, usually seen in children. Textile/hat fibers are usually of a different color and texture compared to the hair, making them easy to distinguish. Hair dye remnants may either present as ill-defined rhomboidal areas of hyperpigmentation in the interfollicular areas or black dots due to preferential deposition in empty hair follicles. Make-up foundation may adhere to the hair shafts, especially on the frontal areas and might give an appearance similar to trichomycosis axillaris. Artificial hair fibers are usually slightly different in diameter compared to normal hair shafts and are generally short and straight. Rarely performing trichoscopy right after a haircut might show short hair fragments, which are similar in color, thickness, and texture to normal hair.[3]

This case is presented to highlight the need to keep in mind the possibility of artefacts such as artificial hair building fibers, while performing trichoscopy. Trichoscopy can also be useful in differentiating among artefacts such as hair building fibers, textile fibers, dirty dots seen in children, leftover hair dye, and make-up foundation.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Jain N, Doshi B, Khopkar U. Trichoscopy in Alopecias: Diagnosis Simplified. Int J Trichol 2013;5:170-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Rudnicka L, Rakowska A, Oslzewska M, Slowinska M, Czuwara J, Rusek M, et al. Hair shafts. In: Rudnicka L, Oslzewska M, Rakowska A, editors. Atlas of Trichoscopy. 1st ed. London: Springer-Verlag; 2012. pp. 11-46.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rudnicka L, Rakowska L. Tips, tricks and artifacts in trichoscopy. In: Rudnicka L, Oslzewska M, Rakowska A, editors. Atlas of Trichoscopy. 1st ed. London: Springer-Verlag; 2012. pp. 121- 41.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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