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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 408-411

A hospital based cross sectional study of midline cutaneous lesions in neonates and its association with spinal dysraphism detected using ultrasound


1 Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
2 Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
3 Department of Neonatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
4 Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Devinder Mohan Thappa
Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry - 605 006
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_748_20

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Background: Spinal dysraphism occurs due to incomplete fusion of the midline mesenchymal, bony, or neural elements of the spine. The defects in the spinal cord can be associated with skin lesion since both have same embryonic origin. Aims and Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the association of midline and paramedian cutaneous lesions with spinal dysraphism by using spinal ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: Two thousand apparently healthy neonates were screened in the postnatal ward of a tertiary care center in South India. Those neonates with cutaneous lesions in the midline and paramedian region were screened for evidence of spinal dysraphism by using spinal ultrasonography. Results: Among 2000 neonates, 120 (6%) had at least one cutaneous lesion, of which 114 (5.7%) were in the midline and 6 (0.3%) were on the paramedian region of dorsal and ventral aspect of the body. Among these neonates, two cases had more than one skin lesions. The most common cutaneous lesion observed was typical dimple (82, 68%) followed by hypertrichosis (12, 10%). Ultrasonography revealed spinal anomaly in six (5%) of them. The cutaneous lesions associated with spinal dysraphism were obvious midline swelling, dermal sinus, and multiple skin lesions. Conclusion: Congenital midline and paramedian skin lesions may be the marker of spinal dysraphism. In the presence of such cutaneous lesions, only 5% of them had associated spinal anomaly in our study.


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