• Users Online: 1640
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

 
THROUGH THE DERMOSCOPE
Ahead of print publication  

Dermatoscopy of nevus anemicus


 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Date of Web Publication20-Jun-2021

Correspondence Address:
Keshavamurthy Vinay,
Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_679_20



How to cite this URL:
Thakur V, Dev A, Vinay K. Dermatoscopy of nevus anemicus. Indian Dermatol Online J [Epub ahead of print] [cited 2021 Sep 28]. Available from: https://www.idoj.in/preprintarticle.asp?id=318484



A 24-year-old male presented with a hypopigmented patch on left side of neck since birth. On examination, a well to ill-defined hypopigmented patch with few satellite lesions was seen in left supraclavicular area and left side of neck [Figure 1]. There was no scaling, leucotrichia, or decreased/loss of sensations. Appendages were preserved. There were no other features to suggest neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis or any other vascular or pigmentary anomaly. On vigorous rubbing, no lesional erythema was observed. Diascopy with a glass slide showed blending of the borders of the lesion with the surrounding skin. On Wood's lamp examination, no accentuation was seen. A clinical diagnosis of nevus anemicus was suspected. Non-contact dermatoscopy (Dermlite, DL4) showed paucity of blood vessels in the lesional skin with diffuse erythema and linear telangiectatic vessels indicating compensatory flare in the surrounding skin [Figure 2]a. On contact dermoscopy, the lesional skin blended with the surrounding skin with indistinguishable borders. The erythema in the surrounding skin decreased in intensity and the linear telangiectatic vessels were more distinct and focused [Figure 2]b.
Figure 1: Well to ill-defined hypopigmented patch with few satellite lesions and linear streaks in the periphery of lesion in left supraclavicular area and left side of neck

Click here to view
Figure 2: (a): Non-contact dermoscopic image showing paucity of blood vessels in the lesional skin (arrow heads) with diffuse erythema and linear telangiectatic vessels in the surrounding skin (Dermlite, DL4 10×); (b): Contact dermoscopy showing blending of the lesional skin with the surrounding skin with indistinguishable margins. The linear telangiectatic vessels are distinct and focused compared to non-contact dermatoscopy (Dermlite, DL4 10×)

Click here to view


Nevus anemicus (NA) is a rare congenital vascular anomaly characterized by hypopigmented confluent and mottled macules or patches.[1] It may be associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, tuberous sclerosis and phakomatosis pigmentovascularis.[2] Nevus anemicus has to be differentiated clinically from other hypopigmented lesions including nevus depigmentosus (ND), ash-leaf macules, hypomelanosis of Ito, vitiligo, pityriasis alba and leprosy. Dermoscopic features of these hypopigmented conditions are specific, making differentiation easier.[3] Dermoscopy of our case showed paucity of blood vessels in the center of lesion with compensatory flare in the surrounding skin and blending with the surrounding on contact dermoscopy akin to diascopy, which is well in accordance with its pathogenesis.[2] Thus, recognition of these characteristic dermoscopic features is helpful in reaching an early clinical diagnosis.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Ahkami RN, Schwartz RA. Nevus anemicus. Dermatology 1999;198:327-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Kolb L, Troxell T, Krishnamurthy K. Nevus Anemicus. StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing Copyright © 2020, StatPearls Publishing LLC.; 2020.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Al-Refu K. Dermoscopy is a new diagnostic tool in diagnosis of common hypopigmented macular disease: A descriptive study. Dermatol Reports 2019;11:7916.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

 
Top
 
 
  Search
 
     Search Pubmed for
 
    -  Thakur V
    -  Dev A
    -  Vinay K
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed233    
    PDF Downloaded5    

Recommend this journal