Indian Dermatology Online Journal

DERMATOLOGY PEARLS
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1027--1028

Clinical photography during COVID-19 with a selfie stick and smart phone


Deepak Jakhar1, Yasmeen Jabeen Bhat2, Ishmeet Kaur1,  
1 Department of Dermatology, North Delhi Municipal Corporation Medical College and Hindu Rao Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Dermatology, Government Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Correspondence Address:
Ishmeet Kaur
Department of Dermatology, North Delhi Municipal Corporation Medical College and Hindu Rao Hospital, New Delhi - 110 007
India




How to cite this article:
Jakhar D, Bhat YJ, Kaur I. Clinical photography during COVID-19 with a selfie stick and smart phone.Indian Dermatol Online J 2020;11:1027-1028


How to cite this URL:
Jakhar D, Bhat YJ, Kaur I. Clinical photography during COVID-19 with a selfie stick and smart phone. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Oct 24 ];11:1027-1028
Available from: https://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2020/11/6/1027/300310


Full Text



 Clinical Problem



Clinical photography is an essential component and integral part of healthcare. These photographs are utilized in clinical documentation, record keeping, medical and surgical procedures, teaching, publication and research. Most often, a close proximity with the patient is unavoidable during clinical photography. With the current COVID-19 scenario, where world health organization (WHO) advocates maintaining social distancing (at least 1 m), it is difficult to take a clinical photograph (especially close-up picture of a lesion). The chance of transmission to and from the device has to be kept in mind and there is always a chance of getting self-infected through aerosol transmission.[1]

 Solution



To avoid close proximity to the patients, a selfie stick can be put to use along with a smart phone. Taking all the universal precautions advised by world health organization (WHO), the smart phone could be mounted on the selfie stick. The stick is then extended to ascertain at least 1-m distance between the patient and the clinician [Figure 1]. The piece of selfie stick holding the phone is hinged and can be adjusted as desired. Depending on the selfie stick, the phone can be connected either with a cable or a Bluetooth. Holding it by both hands can minimize the shaking/tremor of the selfie stick. As the selfie stick and smart phone can become fomites for transmission of virus, after the photography, they should be cleaned with 60–90% isopropyl alcohol for at least 1 minute.[2] The length of selfie stick gives an idea about social distancing (>1 m) at all time during photography.{Figure 1}

Though many smart phones with high-resolution cameras can capture good quality images from a distance, this technique gives an opportunity to take close up picture of lesions. In addition, it will be useful for those clinicians who don't have expensive, high-resolution camera smart phones. Stabilization of the selfie stick while clicking pictures will require some practice, because shaking/tremor of the selfie stick is possible even with both hands. The selfie-stick mounted smartphone can also be used by the patients to self-click pictures of difficult to access areas and use them for teledermatology consultations.[3]

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form, the patient has given his consent for his images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patient understands that name and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal the identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Acknowledgement

The patient in this manuscript have given written informed consent to publication of their case details.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Van Doremalen N, Bushmaker T, Morris DH, Holbrook MG, Gamble A, Williamson BN, et al. Aerosol and surface stability of SARS-CoV-2 as compared with SARS-CoV-1. N Engl J Med 2020;382:1564-7.
2Jakhar D, Kaur I, Kaul S. Art of performing dermoscopy during the times of coronavirus disease (COVID-19): Simple change in approach can save the day!. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2020;34:e242-4.
3Criscito MC, Stein JA. The selfie skin examination. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016;74 (6):e123-e125.